The Fallacy of ‘No Fear’ in the Fight

I am telling you up front, this is going to be a long article. There’s no way around it unfortunately. This is an important, and mostly misunderstood subject in the world of interpersonal violence. As such it needs some serious unpacking. While this article may not answer all on this topic, I hope at the very least it’s a start. If you sincere about wanting to train for interpersonal violence, and by the end of the article you agree with my argument, consider joining us in 2018 for our revamped self-preservation programs (click here to get notified when that will happen). Read more

Action Without A Thinker: The Search for Elusive Martial Performance

If you have been following me on Facebook recently, then you know that roughly eight weeks ago I injured myself quit severely on the mat. Two bulged disks later, with one of them compressing on a nerve, has seen me out of action since that day. As my condition improved, mostly down to not doing anything (other than eating donuts), dozens of chiropractic and physiotherapy sessions later — with some, what might consider out there craniosacral therapies – I started thinking of ways to start, although slowly my physical recovery. Read more

How The Modern World is Making You Lose Your Spidey Sense

Last week while running a training event at Google and AirBnB I made a prediction. In the coming decade, what we are going to most struggle with in the Western world, the thing that will be most evident (if it isn’t already) is our lack of general awareness in everyday life. I don’t mean focus that leads to concentration. It is clear that given something a person values to do (even if it is some silly game with no real point), that people can, if needed focus intently on the task at hand. Focus then can be defined as the act of concentrating your interest or activity on something. In this respect, in order to concentrate on one thing you must, by default, ignore many other things. And this is where I think the real issue lies. Read more

What I Taught at Google

There were three lines in a book that changed my life, “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” As simple as this advice sounds from Victor Frankl author of Man’s Search for Meaning — it is arguably the most profound, life changing advice I ever read. Not only did I read it, I put it into action in my own life. I changed the trajectory of a life fraught with violence growing up, to one of success, designed, and implemented on my own terms. Simply I chose my own attitude in any given circumstances I found myself in, to one of success. Read more